Last edited by Mogar
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Understanding the Phaedrus found in the catalog.

Understanding the Phaedrus

Proceedings of the II Symposium Platonicum (International Plato studies)

  • 61 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Academia Verlag .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Immortality (Philosophy),
  • Congresses,
  • Phaedo,
  • Plato

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPerfect Paperback
    Number of Pages328
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9008900M
    ISBN 103883456306
    ISBN 109783883456300

    L. Rossetti Preface 9 PART I Relative Chronology on The Relative Dating of the Timaeus and Phaedrus 23 C. J. Rowe La data relativa del Fedro 31 C. Eggers Lan Zeus e anima del mondo nel Fedro (ec) 40 Rhetoric T. Calvo Socrates' First Speech in the Phaedrus and Plato's Criticism of Rhetoric 47 L. Brisson L'unité du Phèdre de Platon. This full-length study of Plato's dialogue Phaedrus, now in paperback, is written in the belief that such concerted scrutiny of a single dialogue is an important part of the project of understanding Plato so far as possible 'from the inside' - of gaining a feel for the man's philosophy.

    In addition to the introduction, the book contains substantial commentaries and thorough endnotes. Key Greek terms are discussed for readers who are unfamiliar with the language. A special feature is a discussion on the importance of the dramatic and literary aspects of the dialogues for interpreting their philosophical content. The boast of the Sophist is made not only in the Gorgias, by Gorgias (the episode concerning the doctor), it is echoed toward the conclusion of the Phaedrus; Socrates, playing sophist, argues: "I do make this boast: even someone who knows the truth couldn't produce conviction on the basis of a systematic art without me" (d).

    The Frogs Desiring a King With equal laws when Athens throve, The petulance of freedom drove Their state to license, which overthrew Those just restraints of old they knew. Hence, as a factious discontent Through every rank and order went, Pisistratus the tyrant form'd A party, and the fort he storm'd: Which yoke, while all bemoaned in grief (Not that he was a cruel chief, But they . Gaius Julius Phaedrus (/ ˈ f iː d r ə s /; Greek: Φαῖδρος; Phaîdros) was a 1st-century CE Roman fabulist and the first versifier of a collection of Aesop's fables into Latin. Few facts are known about him for certain and there was little mention of his work during late was not until the discovery of a few imperfect manuscripts during and following the Renaissance that.


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Understanding the Phaedrus Download PDF EPUB FB2

Phaedrus Summary. Buy Study Guide. Socrates meets Phaedrus in Athens. Phaedrus has spent the morning listening to Lysias deliver a speech on love, and now he desires to take a walk outside the city. Since Socrates expresses a keen interest in hearing Lysias's speech, Phaedrus manages to lure him out to the countryside.

Written in the 4th century BC, "Phaedrus" is Understanding the Phaedrus book of Plato’s erotic dialogues. Addressing themes as love, friendship and beauty as well as lust, madness, the nature of the soul and rhetoric, ultimately this is another installment of Socrates’ philosophy as a manifestation of love for wisdom/5(8).

How delightful is the breeze: so very sweet; and there is a sound in the air shrill and summerlike which makes answer to the chorus of the cicadae.

But the greatest charm of all is the grass, like a pillow gently sloping to the head. My dear Phaedrus, you have been an admirable guide. Socrates runs into Phaedrus outside Athens, who follows his exercising routine suggested by their common friend and doctor Acumenus.

Phaedrus has just left Lysias, son of Cephalus, a well known rhetorician and his lover, who gave a speech on love. Socrates convinces Phaedrus to share its details in a discourse. His book is a study of the Phaedrus prepared as part of a series of Purdue University Press' History of Philosophy Series, each volume of which is devoted to a detailed consideration of a specific philosophical by: Phaedrus, (born c.

15 bc, Thrace—died ad 50, Italy), Roman fabulist, the first writer to Latinize whole books of fables, producing free versions in iambic metre of Greek prose fables then circulating under the name of Aesop. A slave by birth, Phaedrus went to Italy early in life, became a freedman in the emperor Augustus’ household, and received the usual education in.

Plato, The Phaedrus – a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus written down by the pupil of Socrates, Plato, in approximately BC. [Headnote: In reading this excerpt from The Phaedrus which reports a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus, crucial to your understanding of what bothers Socrates about writing is knowing a bit about his history and his own philosophical.

In effect, Plato sets up a debate between two rival views of Love held by Lysias (as read from a book by Phaedrus) and Socrates. Unlike "The Symposium", this dialogue is conducted outdoors by a stream under the shade of two tall trees (one a plane tree, the other a chaste tree).

It is also a much more sober affair/5. Phaedrus, the narrator explains, divided human understanding into two approaches, “classic” and “romantic.” Phaedrus, the narrator says, operated within this alienating context of opposing ideologies.

Phaedrus was in pursuit of the “ghost” of Phaedrus studied the ghost of reason because he saw it as a way to study his. In the text, Book III, Fable xi is “The Eunuch to the Abusive Man”; all following fables in Riley are numbered one higher than in the Table of Contents. This fable is missing from Smart but the number X is skipped, as was number   Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project by: 'This book sets out to tackle some of the most vexing questions pertaining to one of the most challenging and perplexing of Plato’s dialogues, the Phaedrus the discussion is always fresh, clear, helpful, sophisticated, and detailed.

The Phaedrus is among Plato's deepest and most moving dialogues. It is full of myth, poetry, insight and thought. Even more than is the case with most of Plato, it is difficult to pin this work down to consider it as a treatise on a single subject matter. The dialogue form and Plato's own thinking do not allow such reduction.4/5.

Phaedrus, a teacher of creative and technical writing at a small college, became engrossed in the question of what defines good writing, and what in general defines good, or "Quality", which he understands similar to : Robert M.

Pirsig. The focus of this account is how myth and formal argument in the dialogue Phaedrus complement and reinforce each other in Plato's philosophy.

Not only is the dialogue in its formal structure a joining of myth and argument, but the philosophic life that it praises is also shaped by the limitations of argument and the importance of mythical and poetic understanding.

Written in the 4th century BC, "Phaedrus" is one of Plato’s erotic dialogues. Addressing themes as love, friendship and beauty as well as lust, madness, the nature of the soul and rhetoric, ultimately this is another installment of Socrates’ philosophy as a manifestation of love for wisdom/5(12).

of Phaedrus: is it a dialogue about rhetoric. Or is it about Love. Or perhaps it is about both. If so, how are we supposed to understand the connection between Rhetoric and Love.

The book itself is divided into 2 parts: the first part is about Love and. Socrates meets Phaedrus, who has just come from a performance by Lysias, a well-known orator, and Socrates agrees to accompany him on a walk outside the walls of Athens.

Phaedrus then reads Lysias's speech to Socrates. The major themes of the Phaedrus are introduced in these opening scenes of the dialogue: Love. ✏Phaedrus Book Summary: Phaedrus is widely recognized as one of Plato's most profound and beautiful works.

It takes the form of a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus and its ostensible subject is love, especially homoerotic love. Phaedrus excused himself, although, Socrates insisted that Phaedrus to retell the speech.

Plato wrote the Phaedrus that was a dialogue and discussion of philosophical issues between Socrates and Phaedrus. In the book of Phaedrus, it is revealed that Socrates did not like writing claiming that writing did not represent a complete knowledge.

Recommended Citation. Martha Nussbaum, "'This story isn't true': Poetry, Goodness, and Understanding in Plato's Phaedrus," in Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts, Julius Moravcsik & Philip Temko eds.

(Rowman & Allanheld, ).Cited by: 3.Ostensibly a discussion about love, the debate in the Phaedrus also encompasses the art of rhetoric and how it should be practised. This new edition contains an introductory essay outlining the argument of the dialogue as a whole and Plato's arguments about .Okay, so Plato's Phaedrus isn't exactly a literary text, but you know by now that deconstructionists and poststructuralists don't give a dang about the differences between literature and philosophy.

And even if they did, a lot of Plato's work is pretty conventionally literary anyway, if we do say so ourselves. After all, dialogues like Phaedrus are stories about Plato's .